5 Ways To Make Food Healthier While On FMD Diet

One of the most rewarding and fulfilling lessons we learned while undergoing the fast metabolism diet is food awareness, that is to say, which ones are beneficial and which lot could sabotage our metabolism. However, do you know that you can make your every meal healthier than it already is?

5 Ways to Make Your Food More Healthier While On FMD Diet

Here are our top 5 tips on how to make heartier and healthier meals while you’re on fast metabolism diet.

1. Know When To Choose Organic Food

Although we recommend to our dieters to patronize organic food whenever possible, we understand that it is a bit expensive. For our dieters who cannot afford to go all-organic yet, we recommend you start first with fruits and veggies, and animal protein.

organic is worth it

These two types of food group are most vulnerable to pesticides, growth hormones, and chemicals, and we eat consume them on a daily basis. This increases our risks of acquiring mortal diseases such as Diabetes, High Blood, Stroke, and Heart disease. The following are the list of food we recommend for you to switch to organic first:

  • Turkey, Beef, Chicken, Pork
  • Strawberries, Raspberries, and Cherries
  • Apples and Pears
  • Tomatoes
  • Spinach and Salad Greens
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Celery
  • Peppers
  • Cucumbers

2. Combine Powerful Food with Better Nutrient Absorption

Fortunately, we’ve already got this tip half-covered. We strategically  designed your meal map, as well the foods you eat to help your body get the optimum nutrition it needs. But if you want to boost your nutrient absorption further, you can combine these powerful, nutrition-house foods into your meal recipes.

Tomatoes and Olive Oil – We all know that the Lycopene found on tomatoes have powerful cancer-fighting antioxidant properties but this nutrient is best absorbed when combined with a healthy fat such as olive oil. It is also revealed that lycopene absorbs more efficiently when you processed it into natural tomato puree and paste.

Spinach and Lemon juice (from squeezed lemons) – Green, leafy veggies contain Iron that promotes healthy blood circulation in your body. The presence of vitamin C enhances iron absorption up to 6 more times.

Eggs and Avocado – These two types of food are match-made in heaven. The healthy fats found in avocado helps the absorption of fat-soluble vitamin D found in eggs.

3. Eat Slowly and Chew

Tip of the Week: Chew your Food Thoroughly! A study says people reported feeling fuller when they ate slowly, thus helping you lose weight.:

We may sound like a broken playlist by now, but we’ll never get tired of reminding you of this simple and gentle advice: Chew your foods well and eat slowly. Breaking your foods into smaller chunks will ease your digestion. It can also help your gut to absorb the energy and nutrients from digesting foods.

Aside from that, your brain normally takes 20 minutes before it sends a signal that you’re full. So take time and relish in the foods you’re eating to avoid overeating.

4. Know when to soak, crush, or sprout your ingredients.

Our nutrient intake is not only determined by the food we eat but also with the way it is cooked. In order to get the optimum nutrition you need, here is a guide on when to apply the necessary cooking method for your meals.

Soak – Soaking legumes and beans overnight will help improve the nutritional value of your meals. Since legumes and beans have water-soluble nutrients after soaking, it will help your body to absorb minerals such as iron, calcium, zinc, and magnesium easier.

Sprout – This method is good for pulse veggies such as alfalfa, mung bean. and chickpeas since they require more effort to soak. Sprouting can also increase the availability of nutrients stored in these veggies. Sprouting is best recommended if you’re making salads since it gives an extra nutrient boost.

5. Know when To Eat Raw/Cooked/Frozen Foods.

Whether you prefer to eat raw or cooked foods, we cannot deny that foods are nutritional powerhouses. But do you know when is the best time to eat them?

If the foods are rich either in Vitamin B1, B5, Folate, and Vitamin C, we recommend to eat them as raw. It’s because these veggies are sensitive to heat. When heated, their nutritional value decreases, so it’s best to eat them in their natural, uncooked state.

If the foods are rich in beta-carotene, (such as squash, carrots, and sweet potatoes) lycopene (tomatoes), we recommend to eat them best when cooked.

For fruits, you can eat them either as fresh or frozen. But research found that frozen fruits and veggies actually have richer nutrient compounds like vitamin C, antioxidants such as lutein and beta-carotene than their fresh alternatives. Frozen carrots and blueberries are the living proof of that.

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