New Study Says a Fish-Rich Diet Could Lessen the Risk of Depression

Diet has been one way or another linked to the risk of getting depression. Such that a diet rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables and fish provide an impact. And recently, a new study suggests that for those people who eat a lot of fish are less likely to be depressed. With men reduced their risk of depression by 20% and women with 16%. But still, further studies must be met for not a single one has looked at the individual components and was able to link the connection between fish and depression risk.

IMG_0910Omega 3 fatty acids, which are found in fish, were suggested by researchers that they may alter the microstructure of brain membranes, modifying the activity of dopamine and serotonin which are neurotransmitters thought to be involved in depression. And that eating a lot of fish may be an indicator of a healthier diet that can help stave off depression for its high quality protein, vitamins and minerals.

“The association between fish consumption and risk of depression is controversial,” said Professor Dongfeng Zhang at the Medical College of Qingdao University, Shandong, China. He added that many studies have investigated the link between food consumption and depression risk. And with the recently published meta-analysis which indicates healthy dietary pattern characterized by a eating fruits, vegetables, fish and whole grains at higher consumption, has a significant correlation with a reduced risk of depression. But yet, isn’t clear which component of the dietary pattern is responsible for the protective effect.

“Fish, as an important source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), which may play important roles in neural structure and function, has been reported to be associated with depression in several studies,” Prof. Zhang explained, “However, others did not find an association between fish consumption and depression risk”.

In the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, published was a study that looked at all relevant worldwide studies printed between 2001 and 2014 that examined the link of fish consumption and depression risk. And only the European studies backed up the study.

Zhang then added that a higher fish consumption may be beneficial in the primary prevention of depression, but further studies must be done whether this association varies to the type of fish accordingly.

“The specific mechanisms require large experimental studies to confirm,” Zhang concluded.

The findings given here were based on 16 articles which include 26 studies  with 150,278 participants involved, but did not define the portion of fish to consume weekly or how it must be prepared.

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